News and Events

Lomakatsi News & Events

Archives of Lomakatsi’s Accomplishments:

2011 – 2012 – 2013 – 2014 – 2015

5/26/2017 – A new video from the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project about the importance of bringing mild fire back to the landscape.


4/27/2017 – Restoring Habitat for Monarch Butterflies in Southern Oregon on JPR

Lomakatsi, the Southern Oregon Monarch Advocates and the Selberg Institute were interviewed about our landscape scale pollinator habitat restoration project occurring on over 300 acres in Southern Oregon. The other partners in this exciting project include U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife, Bureau of Land Management and The Nature Conservancy. Listen to the full story online.

JPR interviewing Lomakatsi Restoration Ecologist Sean Prive

JPR interviewing Lomakatsi Restoration Ecologist Sean Prive


4/13/2017 – Ashland High School students plant monarch butterfly way station at Willow Wind

Thanks to students from Ashland High School there is a new pollinator waystation next to Paradise and Bear Creeks. Milkweed, buckwheat, Oregon sunshine and yarrow were a few of the pollinator-friendly native plants put in the ground last week, with guidance from Lomakatsi’s Riparian Restoration Manager Niki Del Pizzo. This is the same site that had been cleared of invasive by OSU Alternative Spring Break students a couple of weeks previous.


3/28/2017 – OSU Alternative Spring Break students lend a hand for monarch butterflies

Instead of heading to Cancun for their spring break, these wonderful OSU students decided to visit southern Oregon and volunteer for a range of community organizations – including Lomakatsi! First they helped break ground and remove weeds for a monarch butterfly waystation at our Willow Wind School Bear Creek restoration site, a project funded by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Schoolyard Habitat program. Ashland High School students will be following up by putting pollinator friendly native plants in the ground at this site.
After lunch the OSU students visited our native plant nursery and helped weed and fertilize the plants that will eventually head out to our restoration sites. 


3/19/2017 – Spring plant nursery tending event

Wow, many hands make light work, that is for sure! Thank you so much to everyone who came out to help care for Lomakatsi’s Native Plant Nursery at Jackson Wellsprings on Sunday. The nursery was weeded and put into order, and Lomakatsi was able to welcome spring with a happy nursery full of well-fed plants. Thank you everyone! What would we do without you!


3/8/2017 – Bear Creek Restoration Efforts by Local Students Growing Bigger and Better! 

We would love to thank all of the Cascade Christian High School students that spent the day planting native shrubs and trees along the banks of Bear Creek with us this week! We have been working with students to restore the creek next to their school for the past 8 years, and it is exciting to see the riparian restoration continuing upstream towards the confluence with Lone Pine Creek.

These plantings and the removal of invasives will support land-based wildlife and help foster cooler water in the creek that is more favorable to fish such as chinook, coho and steelhead. Thanks to The Freshwater Trust, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Schoolyard Habitat and Pacific Power’s Blue Sky Program for partnering with us and being part of making this happen!



12512361_972891046098946_3307260714717254490_nCelebrate Spring! Nursery Tending

Sunday March 19, 10:00am-1:00pm, Ashland

Spring is in the air! Help tend our baby plants at the Lomakatsi Jackson Wellsprings Nursery. This event is FREE and everyone is welcome to come join in the fun!

Click here to register for this event. For questions contact Sheila at 541-488-0208


 3/3/2017 – Lomakatsi Restoration Project, Ashland Fire & Rescue work to restore watershed ecosystem – News 10
Lomakatsi’s work with partners in the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project was featured on News 10. View video of the story and read the article on the News 10 website.

3/3/17news10story

Read more about our work with the AFR partnership here.


2/15/17 – Lomakatsi and partners in the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project were out on the ground recently reviewing ecological restoration prescriptions developed for City of Ashland lands. The Partnership is working with a technical review team that helps to ensure we are meeting the ecological objectives outlined in the project proposal. This process provides an important checks-and-balances function for the project. We were happy to be joined by some our AFR partners The Nature Conservancy, OWEB, City of Ashland, NRCS, ODF, U.S. Forest Service, and OSU Extension.

Read more about our work with the AFR partnership here.


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Second Annual 
Singing to the Trees

with
Lomakatsi Restoration Project
Tuesday, December 20, 2016
3 – 5 pm
Siskiyou Mountain Park
Meet at the corner of Park and Crestview Streets in Ashland

A Chance to Thank the Trees for All they Do for Us!
FREE fun for the whole family
Join us in singing songs from around the world as we through the forest.
Hot chocolate from Mix Sweetshop and treats will be provided.

For questions contact Sheila at 541-778-7356.

Register for the event.


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Last year millions of Americans decided to #OptOutside on Black Friday.
This year, we join REI to encourage Americans to pass on the malls and head outside after Thanksgiving.

This Friday, try Opting Out to some of these beautiful places where we’ve been working.


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restoration-day_smallPlease Join Us!!
Lend a hand – Help restore for pollinators and create
Monarch butterfly waystations.

It’s fun for the whole family!
Come rain or shine, help the fish, birds and butterflies.

call Sheila at 541-778-7356


forest-fish

Please Join Us!!
Ashland Watershed
Enjoy a light breakfast at the Top
and Treats at the Bottom.
Hike It or Bike It
(Experienced Mtn Bikers Only)
Extra Points for Wearing Your Halloween Costume!
Shuttle Service Available
Registration Required, call Sheila at 541-778-7356
FREE
bike


Making ecosystems more resilient in the face of climate change is a big part of Lomakatsi’s work, and thanks to a $200,000 award from the Wildlife Conservation Society, matched by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife, restoring oak woodlands at Table Rocks over the last two years has been possible. Work resumed again this week and will continue until the end of October. This phase of the project will take place on land managed by The Nature Conservancy and the Bureau of Land Management and encompasses approximately 400 acres. The entire project over the next two to three years encompasses nearly 1400 acres and involves private landowners, the Natural Resource Conservation Service and many others.

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Lomakatsi’s Rogue Valley restoration crew thinning around legacy oaks at Table Rock.

No trail closures are expected for this phase of the work at Table Rocks, but there may be some noise from the chainsaws thinning out potential wildfire fuels and other trees and shrubs in an effort to make the oaks healthier and more resilient. The work will take place fairly close to the trails at times, so it is a great opportunity for visitors to Table Rocks to learn more about what it takes to care for our oak woodlands – and all the threats they face.


Lomakatsi Wine and Woods Tour
wine

A little hiking, a little wine tasting.
Please Join Us
Sunday, Oct 2!

A Unique Opportunity to Explore the Applegate with Lomakatsi
Shuttle leaves Lomakatsi offices in Ashland
at 11 and returns at 5pm.

The Enchanted Forest is a three mile round-trip easy to moderate hike through oak woodlands, meadows and pine forest. Start the adventure with a visit to Wooldridge Creek Winery, then hike the Enchanted Forest and finish with a visit to Red Lily Winery.

This event is FREE for members and their guests. Please limit one guest per member. The price of wine tasting is NOT included (flights range from $8 to $16, cash preferred)

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED and SPACE IS LIMITED.
Call Sheila at 541-778-7356 to register or with questions.


We would like to introduce the newest addition to the Lomakatsi Restoration Project Staff, Sean Prive. Sean began working for Lomakatsi in the spring of 2016, serving as the organization’s Restoration Ecologist. Sean received his master’s in forestry through the Forest Ecosystems and Society Program at Oregon State University. Sean works closely with Lomakatsi’s technical staff, helping to integrate the best available science into restoration project design, practice and implementation. We welcome Sean to our team and look forward to utilizing his many talents as our primary restoration ecologist.

Sean has been studying oaks for over a decade and will play a lead role in our oak restoration efforts. To find out more about Lomakatsi’s oak program visit our website: http://lomakatsi.org/oak-habitat-restoration/

SeanPrivesm


September 1, 2016 – Modoc County Record: Tribes cooperate on restoration project

A key component of the juniper thinning project on the Fort Bidwell Reservation was for nonprofit ecological restoration organization Lomakatsi Restoration Project to provide tribal workforce development, training them in skills needed for ecological restoration.

A key component of the juniper thinning project on the Fort Bidwell Reservation was for nonprofit ecological restoration organization Lomakatsi Restoration Project to provide tribal workforce development, training them in skills needed for ecological restoration. (Click here to read the article)


Friday August 19, 2016 – Restoring Anderson Creek

A tangle of 12-foot high blackberry brambles and a solitary Walnut tree was all Lomakatsi Riparian Manager Niki Del Pizzo saw the first time she visited a property on Anderson Creek almost a year ago.

Twelve-foot blackberry brambles and a solitary walnut tree were all that met Niki’s eye when she first visited the site. The creek was almost completely hidden.

Twelve-foot blackberry brambles and a solitary walnut tree were all that met Niki’s eye when she first visited the site. The creek was almost completely hidden.

OSU Alternative Spring Break students came from Corvalis, volunteering half a day to help restore 300 feet of Anderson Creek in Talent.

OSU Alternative Spring Break students came from Corvalis, volunteering half a day to help restore 300 feet of Anderson Creek in Talent.

OSU Alternative Spring Break students came from Corvalis, volunteering half a day to help restore 300 feet of Anderson Creek in Talent.

OSU Alternative Spring Break students came from Corvalis, volunteering half a day to help restore 300 feet of Anderson Creek in Talent.

Native trees and shrubs were planted along the creek, once the blackberries were removed. The diversity of native plants will provide shade for the water, improving fish habitat, and food for birds and other wildlife, bringing balance back to the creek.

Native trees and shrubs were planted along the creek, once the blackberries were removed. The diversity of native plants will provide shade for the water, improving fish habitat, and food for birds and other wildlife, bringing balance back to the creek.

Today, the winding waters of Anderson Creek are clearly visible. Native trees and shrubs have been planted and will grow to shade the waters. Funding from Jackson Soil and Water, matched by the landowner, made the project possible.

Today, the winding waters of Anderson Creek are clearly visible. Native trees and shrubs have been planted and will grow to shade the waters. Funding from Jackson Soil and Water, matched by the landowner, made the project possible.

Today, thanks to the hard work of many hands, 300 feet of Anderson Creek are now cleared of blackberries, and a healthy, diverse fish and bird habitat is returning. Over the years, newly planted native trees and shrubs will start to shade the water, keeping it cool and hopefully helping fish to return to the area. Best of all, the area is not only being restored for wildlife, it is now a place people can enjoy – and keep caring for., click.

The project is a great example of the important role landowners can play in restoring waterways that cross their land. It’s also an example of how schools and community groups play a role in restoration – much of the blackberry clearing was done by Jackson County Community Justice crews. Oregon State University students also volunteered their time as part of OSU’s Alternative Spring Break program. Jackson Soil and Water helped to fund the project. With 300 feet completed, there are just another 200 feet to go before Lomakatsi has finished the project. Next steps? Getting more landowners along Anderson Creek excited about restoring more sections of the creek. To learn more about Lomakatsi’s Aquatic Habitat Restoration Program visit, click.


Teachers Test Their Technical Forestry Skills with Lomakatsi

A+ to the August Institute teachers and students from Southern Oregon University Environmental Education Masters Program who joined Lomakatsi in the Ashland watershed yesterday to hone their technical forestry skills. Lomakatsi Riparian Manager and Education Director Niki Del Pizzo lead the group of 15 teachers through a typical youth field lesson. Teachers had a chance to test their map reading and compass skills, and learn more about the tools we use to measure canopy density, tree age and height, and much more. Lomakatsi has been bringing high school students and teachers out into the watershed since 2010, offering free field visits and an opportunity to learn more about the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project to more than 200 high school students and their teachers every year. To learn more about our education programs, visit our website at http://lomakatsi.org/full-circle-schools-restoration-ecolo…/

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We would like to introduce the newest addition to the Lomakatsi Restoration Project Staff, Sean Prive. Sean began working for Lomakatsi in the spring of 2016, serving as the organization’s Restoration Ecologist. Sean received his master’s in forestry through the Forest Ecosystems and Society Program at Oregon State University. Sean works closely with Lomakatsi’s technical staff, helping to integrate the best available science into restoration project design, practice and implementation. We welcome Sean to our team and look forward to utilizing his many talents as our primary restoration ecologist.

Sean has been studying oaks for over a decade and will play a lead role in our oak restoration efforts. To find out more about Lomakatsi’s oak program visit our website: http://lomakatsi.org/oak-habitat-restoration/

SeanPrivesm


Lomakatsi Celebrates the Graduation of the 2016 Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program

Yesterday Mayor John Stromberg of Ashland, Forest Supervisor for the Rogue-Siskiyou National Forest Rob McWhorter, Ashland City Councilwoman Stefani Seffinger, and Forest Service Stewardship Coordinator for The Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project Don Boucher and Lomakatsi staff leadership all gathered to congratulate graduates of the 2016 Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program. Twenty Youth from throughout the Rogue Valley and as far away as Bend attended the four-week program, braving bees, poison oak and lots of hard work, and a ton of fun, restoring the Ashland Watershed and other sites throughout the region.

The program is made possible through the generous support of the City of Ashland Oregon, the U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Lomakatsi Restoration Project, the Oregon Community Foundation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and many supporting partners.

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TWO YOUTH PROGRAMS BROUGHT TOGETHER

July 25, 2016 –  Pit River ancestral lands near Burney, CA, east of Mount Shasta

– Pit River Tribal Youth Ecosystem Workforce Program

– Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program

Tribal leaders and cultural practitioners of the Pit River Tribe hosted Rogue Valley youth in Traditional Ecological Knowledge workshops.

Through a collaborative partnership between the Pit River Tribe, California Trout and agency partners, Lomakatsi employs thirty youth as part of two concurrent Youth Workforce Training and Employment Programs in Southern Oregon and Northern California.

Increasing understanding among different cultures by working together to restore Forest, Woodland and Stream Habitats Across the Region

For more details follow the link below.


All Ashland Watershed Trails and Roads Will Open Wednesday, July 20th!

The last load of logs and machinery are leaving Tuesday and all roads and trails will be open Wednesday. The AFR team REALLY appreciates your patience over the past 7 months while crews and machines worked through snow and heat to create a healthier and safer forest for the community. Progress was significant and this phase is getting closer to complete each year. There will be roughly 400 acres of helicopter work in the fall (we just finished 928) along with 250 acres of “light on the land” non-helicopter logging to finish after fire season. Burning will begin when wet weather sets in.

Enjoy the many updated and new trails across the watershed over the summer.

THANK YOU!


Lomakatsi Ecosystem Worker Appreciation Day, Honoring the Green Collar Workforce

Lomakatsi’s annual Restoration Worker Appreciation Celebration took place this past Friday at Emigrant Lake. Lomakatsi staff, restoration workers and their families joined together for food and fun. This celebration marks 21 years of successful restoration implementation working across thousands of acres throughout northern California and Oregon. Respect and appreciation to the Ecosystem Restoration Workforce who thin the dense, fire-suppressed forests, plant the trees and vegetation along the streams and clearcuts, stabilize the slopes, seed the native forbs and grasses back to the woodlands, stack the sticks to reduce fire hazards and carry the drip torches across the steep slopes in an effort to carefully reintroduce fire back to these landscapes


In this video, Richard, a member of the Ashland Watershed Summer Youth Crew – 2016, explains some things that he learned during the Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program from Dave Clayton (U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest) and Cindy Donegan’s (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) presentation on Forest Health and Endangered Species.



Congrats to Lomakatsi’s youth crew from the Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment program for completing their first week!

It was an action-packed week, with everyone spending most of the week near Horn Gap, where they learned about Pacific Fishers that live in the area, Northern Spotted Owls, how to identify plants from seeds to sprouts and a whole lot more. Everyone worked hard, clearing out ladder fuels (sticks and boughs that can let fire climb up into the tree canopy).

Guest presenters for the first week included: Forest Supervisor of the U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest Rob MacWhorter, Forest Service wildlife biologist Dave Clayton, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Soil Conversationalist Cindy Donegan, The Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project Coordinator Don Boucher, District Ranger of the Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District Donna Mickley, Forest Botanist of the Rogue River‐Siskiyou National Forest Clint Emerson, and Forest Ecologist for The Nature Conservancy Kerry Metlen.


Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program Launches

Lomakatsi would like to welcome the twenty youth from the Rogue Valley recently hired as part of our ecosystem restoration team! Established in 2013 by Lomakatsi Restoration Project as part of the Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project, the Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program provides youth participants with summer employment, hands-on workforce training, and educational experiences in ecosystem restoration, ecological forestry and natural resource stewardship. For more details on the program see photos and captions.

 


Ashland, Job Opportunity

The Ashland Forest Resiliency Project has a job opening through the City of Ashland. The position will manage communications and outreach with the community, organize events and education, and help catalog and report on our wildfire safety and forest restoration work. The position will work with various partners, both internal and external to the AFR partnership, including private landowners under our expanded project called Ashland Forest All-lands Restoration. This half of the job involves working with private landowners under an Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board grant to restore dry forests in a 58,000 acre area in and around Ashland. The OWEB grant is forecasted to continue for five years. The secured AFR project funding is for two years.

Apply Here


 Ashland Forest Resiliency Project Public Tour July 16th! Join AFR partners on a tour to recent helicopter forest thinning and controlled burns to discuss our ongoing work and future plans. Click here for more information. 


Pit River Tribe and Lomakatsi Launch the First Tribal Youth Ecosystem Workforce Program in Northern California

Through an established collaborative partnership between the Pit River Tribe, the Illmawi Band of the Pit River Tribe, Lomakatsi Restoration Project and, California Trout, ten Tribal youth ages 14‐18 will be employed by Lomakatsi as they implement ecosystem restoration activities as part of the Hat Creek Riparian Restoration, Cultural Protection, and Recreation Improvement Project.

This four-week program helps tribal youth gain valuable workforce experience and an opportunity to explore careers in natural resources, ecosystem restoration, science and ecology, and traditional ecological and cultural knowledge.

 


Ashland Watershed Trail and Road Closure Update

Our partner Timberline Helicopters, Inc. is working very hard to finish the helicopter work by this Friday, July 1st so that recreation users can access their favorite trails beginning July 2nd-July 4th . We thank them for all their hard work over the past few months! Some roads and trails will be closed on the weekdays this July to get the logs out of the watershed safely. Please refer to the July closure schedule below for the trails and roads affected.

Happy trails!

**Weekday Closures (Monday through Friday)**
• Forest Service Roads 2060, 2060-400, and 2060-200 will be
closed to all users for log hauling.
• The 2060 Road is closed south of the Potlicker and Horn Gap
Trails. Potlicker, No Candies, and Horn Gap trails are also closed.

**Open Weekends and 4th of July (Saturday and Sunday)**
• All roads and trails are open, EXCEPT for the No Candies trail.
No Candies has log decks and slash across the trail in multiple
areas and will be cleaned up by the end of July.

AFR Temporary Trail Closure Map


FIREWOOD is now available from AFR with a permit from the U.S. Forest Service. There are only 5 permits available at one cord of wood each. Get permits at the USFS Star Ranger Station in the Applegate, or Wednesdays at Ashland Fire Station #2 on Wednesdays. Happy cutting!


Lomakatsi Funded for Riparian Restoration along Bear Creek through Pacific Power’s Blue Sky Habitat Program

Lomakatsi appreciates the partnership with The Freshwater Trust and Pacific Power’s Blue Sky Program that will fund our ongoing efforts to re-establish native trees and shrubs along Bear Creek that will benefit salmon, steelhead and water quality.

In addition to the Bear Creek riparian project, three additional waterways will receive much-needed restoration in 2016, thanks to a partnership between Pacific Power’s Blue Sky Habitat customers and The Freshwater Trust. For more information click this link to the article.

Fish

 


Helicopter Pilot Perspective

Here’s some nice footage of the Timberline Helicopters, Inc. pilot lifting log loads from treatment areas and stacking them at designated staging areas or landings. We thank Timberline for all their hard work and this video footage.


Active Projects Highlight Hat Creek

Lomakatsi, working in close partnership with the Pit River Tribe andCalifornia Trout, is continuing to implement the Hat creek Riparian Restoration, Cultural Protection, and Recreation Improvement Project as an effort to protect wild trout populations and protect the unique cultural and recreational attributes that define Hat Creek as one of California’s most important cold-water spring-fed natural resources. So far, we have been able to accomplish many of the project’s objectives, see photo captions below for some of project accomplishments.

 


Lomakatsi Forest Restoration People

As Lomakatsi’s Lead Restoration Crew Manager, Braulio Cortes oversees our Rogue Valley workforce, who implement many of our restoration projects. Not only does he oversee and train our chain-saw crews, he is also an exceptional restoration technician. Below we have a short clip to show off Braulio’s chainsaw skills, he is by far our most talented sawyer with 12 years of commitment to Lomakatsi. To find out more about Braulio visit his staff page: http://lomakatsi.org/staff-braulio-read-more/

 


Fire’s American Century: From Resistance to Resilience

Mark your calendars!! Stephen J. Pyne, preeminent fire historian, will be speaking in Ashland on June 22nd at 7pm with a reception at 6pm. The reception is at the Schneider Museum of Art and talk is at the Meese Auditorium, both on the Southern Oregon University campus. The event is free and open to the public.


Tribal Ecosystem Workforce Training on Fort Bidwell Northern Paiute Reservation

Through a collaborative partnership, the Fort Bidwell Indian Community Council (FBICC) has joined with the Pit River Tribe and Lomakatsi Restoration Project, for the implementation of a 50-acre sagebrush steppe habitat restoration project on the Fort Bidwell Paiute Reservation. Additional partners include Natural Resources Conservation Service andBureau of Indian Affairs who have provided funding and technical assistance for the project.

Project operations and the associated tribal workforce training program commenced on May 31, 2016 and is nearing completion. Through this partnership, Lomakatsi Restoration Project mobilized their technical staff for project layout, design and training, and has employed a twelve-person tribal workforce which includes 8 members of the Fort Bidwell Paiute, 2 from Pit River Tribe and three participants from the Klamath Tribes. Through Lomakatsi’s Tribal Ecosystem Restoration Partnership Program, Lomakatsi works collaboratively with tribes facilitating business planning, workforce training and employment, and youth engagement in the field of ecosystem restoration. For more details on the project see the photos and captions

The Ecological Restoration Need

Sagebrush steppe is a dry environment and plant community characterized by the dominance of sagebrush shrubs and short bunchgrasses.
During the last 140 years, western juniper has been expanding its range, encroaching dramatically into the sagebrush steppe, reducing habitat for steppe dependent species. This encroachment has largely been fueled by the removal of fire from the landscape. Historically, fire was the natural factor limiting juniper woodlands to rockier ridges. As fire was removed, through suppression efforts and cattle grazing, a population and range explosion began for western juniper. During this time, juniper expanded across the Modoc Plateau, once occupying only 5%, to now occupying nearly half of the 6.5 million acres.
Due to canopy closure, dense juniper woodlands move the ecosystem toward a monoculture. The loss of vegetative diversity negatively effects sagebrush steppe dependent species, resulting in dwindling numbers of key species such as sage-grouse, mule deer and pronghorn.


Continuing Oak Habitat Restoration Efforts Against All Odds

We would like to take a moment to pay our respect to our team of restoration technicians working in the Willamette Valley right now. They are committed to completing the planning phase for 630 acres of The Nature Conservancy Oregon Willamette Valley Oaks. Lomakatsi Restoration Project, even while attacked by angry Yellow Jackets!

John


The Rollins prescribed burn in The Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project is deer approved

 


Lomakatsi Forest Restoration People

Lomakatsi staff fulfill many roles, wearing many hats and helmets to accomplish our mission of restoring ecosystems and sustaining communities. From our crews on the ground, to our administrative leadership, Lomakatsi has a dedicated team. Today we would like to highlight Gary Clarida, who serves as our Shop Manager, Forestry Technician and Workforce Trainer. http://lomakatsi.org/staff-gary-read-more/

Gary


Many thanks to our partners Timberline Helicopters, Inc., for all that they have done for the Ashland community in the past few months!

illegal camping fire


Big Old Trees, Important Ecological Anchors

Protecting large and old legacy trees are a top priority in Lomakatsi’s forest restoration work. This is a picture of this spectacularly large incense cedar found in the Ashland Watershed. Old incense cedars are resilient to low and moderate intensity fires and are drought-tolerant, surviving in both wet and dry site conditions. Although the tree is killed when high intensity, stand-replacing fires occur, it spreads rapidly after lower intensity burns which gives it a competitive advantage over other species.

Legacy Incense Cedar


Tribal Ecosystem Restoration Workforce Training Program Launches on the Fort Bidwell Paiute Reservation

13 tribal workers employed by Lomakatsi began implementing a 50-acre sagebrush steppe habitat restoration project on the Fort Bidwell Paiute Reservation in Northeastern California. Project partners include the Fort Bidwell Indian Community Council, Affairs. Restoration activities entail the selected removal of western juniper which has been expanding its range, encroaching dramatically into the sagebrush steppe and reducing habitat for steppe dependent species. This initiative is designed to build toward a long-term solution that addresses the ecological impacts to the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, promoting the recovery of imperiled species, and through mentoring and on-the-job training the development of a tribal ecological workforce.

Here Lomakatsi’s Technicians and Trainers share their restoration skills with the developing workforce.

The Crew Training

 


Prescribed Fire Timing and its Effects on Mycorrhizal Fungi

Lomakatsi implements forest and riparian restoration projects, and one restorative techniques is prescribed burning. This article looks at the effects of the timing of prescribed burning on Mycorrhizal Fungi communities in Crater Lake National Park. The study found that fungal communities can withstand hot prescribed fire conditions, and that spring timed prescribed burns have very little effect on fungal communities compared to fall timed prescribed burns.

mushrooms


Congratulations to all 2016 Community Grant recipients from the Ashland Co-op!

This inspiring (and silly!) group of nonprofit leaders do so much good throughout Southern Oregon.

Community Grant Recipients

Co-op + Community = A Perfect Match

Learn more


Lomakatsi is proud to endorse a new initiative to provide

FREE Outdoor School for All

– And We’re Asking You to Help TOO!

Outdoor School For All is gathering signatures for a ballot that would ensure every 5th or 6th-grade child in Oregon has a chance to attend a week of outdoor school for free. It’s a fantastic idea and won’t cost tax payers a dime – it’s all paid for by unallocated Lottery funding! But they need our help gathering signatures!
Follow this link to get involved.

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What’s the best way to thin forests to a more natural condition? Turns out, there’s an App for that.

Lomakatsi teamed up with The Klamath Tribe and Stewardship Forestry this last fall to test if accurate forest structure data could be collected with the new Individuals, Clumps, and Openings (ICO) Marking App. This App speeds the process of forest thinning, and calculating density targets. It allows forest managers to know the density of a surrounding tree stand and it creates a stem map of the trees retained after treatment IN REAL TIME. This app helps refine management techniques to mimic historic forest structure conditions.

See the article by NWPR here

ICO team


Announcement

The Pit River Tribe, in partnership with Lomakatsi, is seeking applicants for this summer’s Pit River Tribal Youth Ecosystem Workforce Program. Participants in this program will gain valuable experience through the exploration of career paths in natural resources, ecosystem restoration, science and ecology, and traditional ecological and cultural knowledge.

Who Can Apply: Young men and women at least 14 years old and not older than 18 (as of 6/15/2016). Must be an enrolled member or descendant of a Federally Recognized Tribe and currently attending or have completed high School/GED.
Applications and more information at http://lomakatsi.org/prtyewp/


Building Capacity for Ecological Restoration

Ecological restoration of fire-adapted forests, like we have here in the Klamath-Siskiyou, is not complete until fire is returned to the ecosystem. Lomakatsi’s Burn Boss and other personnel are participating in the Ashland Prescribed Fire Training Exchange – TREX to increase our knowledge and experience that will bring more capacity to our implementation of ecological restoration. Over this two-week training period, this cohort of trainer-trainees have put fire on the ground on private and public lands within the Ashland watershed, Cascade–Siskiyou National Monument, Applegate Valley, and the U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

TREX


Continuing Oak Habitat Restoration Efforts in the Northern Willamette Valley

Lomakatsi teamed up with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) for the second phase of the TNC Willamette Valley Oaks Restoration Program to design oak habitat restoration treatments for 4 TNC owned Nature Preserves in the Northern Willamette Valley totaling nearly 630 acres. The Lomakatsi technical workforce was busy traversing the preserves, determining treatment boundaries, and designating areas of ecological significance. Our goal is to then partner with TNC to write a grant for 2016-2017 that will fund the habitat restoration implementation.

Willamette 1 Willamette 2 Willamette 3


Shout Out to Our Nursery Volunteers

The Nature Conservancy invited their volunteers to Lomakatsi’s native plant nursery at Jackson Wellsprings for this month’s round of nursery upkeep, maintenance, and the potting of native tree and shrub species . Niki Del Pizzo, Lomakatsi’s Education Director, lead a discussion about native tree identification, nursery management, and our local streamside restoration projects. A big thank you to these volunteers!

planting 1 Planting 2 Planting 3


Restoring Fire Adapted Forests Using Prescribed Fire

On Tuesday The City of Ashland Oregon, U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Lomakatsi Restoration Project, and Grayback Forestry, Inc., implemented a prescribed burn across 25 acres below the White Rabbit Trailhead on City forestland.

Prescribed burning is the controlled application of fire to a landscape to accomplish ecological objectives. These fires are managed in such a way as to minimize the emission of smoke and maximize the ecological benefits to the site. Have you ever wondered what a prescribed fire looks like? See the pictures below to find out.

photo 5 photo 4 photo 3 photo 2 photo 1 morning debrief


Prescribed Fire Season has Begun in the Ashland Watershed

In partnership to reduce the risk of severe fire in the Ashland watershed, the City of Ashland Oregon, U.S. Forest Service- Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Lomakatsi Restoration Project and Grayback Forestry, Inc. conducted a prescribed under burn, Tuesday, May 10th. The burn was designed to protect water quality, late-successional habitat, human life and property, and ecosystem sustainability by reducing hazardous fuels and crown fire potential. The objective was to promote forest conditions that are more resilient to wildland fires, when they occur.

This burn took place about one mile above Lithia Park, on the east side of Ashland Creek, below the White Rabbit Trailhead on City forestland. It started in the morning and proceed through the day. Some smoke was visible from town.

The White Rabbit trailhead was closed for the day due to burn traffic and hoses laid across trails. This included the Alice in Wonderland trail, BTO, Red Queen, and Jabberwocky trails.

Burning will likely continue this season so check back for updates on closed roads and trails.

To learn more about Lomaktsi’s Prescribed Fire Program visit our website at http://lomakatsi.org/prescribed-fire/

 

Under Burn


Good News for Ashland Oregon

The weather has held and contractors worked very hard to get the last log truck load down Tolman Creek Road back in May. Thank you to all the residents along the road who have put up with the traffic and road noise for the past few months! We really appreciate it. This also means Tolman Creek Road will be safely accessible to bikers, drivers, and walkers 7 days a week.

log truck


Native Fish of Bear Creek

The restoration of Bear Creek has been important to Lomakatsi for many years. We have engaged thousands of students, planted thousands of native trees and shrubs, and pulled invasive species for miles along the creek. We have done so to promote healthy native fish habitat.

This was an opportunity to learn more about the native fish species of bear creek provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife May 7th from 9am-1pm in North Mountain Park. Attendees learned about how our restoration actions have provided what native fish need to survive and thrive.
Planting Along Bear Creek


Restoring Ponderosa Pine Habitat in the Upper Klamath Basin, Sycan Watershed

As part of a collaborative ecosystem restoration and tribal workforce development partnership between the Klamath Tribes, Lomakatsi, The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), we are in the process of implementing over 1,200 acres of forest thinning as part of the Big Coyote Stewardship Agreement. Forest restoration efforts work to restore ponderosa pine bitterbrush habitat, protecting large old legacy trees and enhancing habitat for the white-headed woodpecker. We are half way through the project and restoration efforts will continue over the next several months.

tractor claw heavy equiptment Ponderosa Pine stand

 


Celebrating 30 years of Environmental Education at Table Rocks

Thank you to The Nature Conservancy and the Bureau of Land Management – Oregon for celebrating 30 years of education at Table Rocks on Saturday, April 30th. The absolute highlight was a blessing and address by Agnes Baker Pilgrim, the oldest member of the Takelma Tribe and the Elected Chairperson of the International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers, who reminded us all of the long history of the Table Rocks and the thousands of years people have cared for the beautiful landmarks. Lomakatsi was honored to be part of the event – and the wildflowers were amazing!

Camas Display close up Agnes 2


 2016

Lomakatsi is now accepting applications for Summer 2016
Ashland Watershed Youth Training and Employment Program

Using the Ashland Watershed as an outdoor laboratory, 20 juniors and seniors from Medford, Phoenix, and Ashland High Schools will spend a month, starting in mid-July, exploring and experiencing career paths in natural resource management. During this four-week program, participants are paid $10 an hour to conduct restoration projects under the guidance of Lomakatsi’s workforce trainers and guest natural resource specialists. More information and applications are now available on our website (http://lomakatsi.org/ashland-watershed-youth-training-and-…/). The deadline for applications is May 9th, 2016. We encourage all interested students to apply.

Apply today!

Apply today!


Restoration Updates

We are happy to announce that the rehab of Lamb Saddle, including tree planting and trail reconnection, was completed Friday, April 29th (just in time for the Siskiyou Challenge)! Lamb Saddle looks different and the process of recovery will take time. Though the impact at Lamb Saddle may seem extensive, it’s temporary, and the more important outcome is the hundreds of acres of healthier and safer forest in our watershed that resulted from the restoration activity.

Similarly, on the other side of the Ashland watershed, the Horn Gap/No Candies trail junction will be used as a drop zone for logs starting next week, as operations shift from east to west. The transition has been delayed due to wet weather so please check back frequently for the latest updates on trial openings and closures.


Plant a Tree for The Planet Program

Plant A Tree For the Planet

Anderson Auto Body & Paint of Ashland Oregon has become a planting partner in Lomakatsi’s Plant a Tree for the Planet Program. For every vehicle serviced at the shop one native tree is planted by Lomakatsi. Request the services of Anderson Auto Body and rest easy that your service repair purchase will help to absorb carbon dioxide, produce oxygen, enhance landscape resiliency in the face of climate change, improve air and water quality, create wildlife habitat! Follow this link to request the services of Anderson Auto Body and Lomakatsi will plant a native tree for every service purchased.


Outdoor Classrooms are the Best Classrooms

Lomakatsi helped two 4th grade classes do their part in restoring Paradise Creek, next to The Willow Wind Community Learning Center in Ashland, OR. These 4th graders learned the difference between native plants and invasive weeds, and the benefits of adding mycorrhizal fertilizer. In a symbiotic relationship with the plants, mycorrhizae enhance soil quality, increase root generation, increase drought resistance, increase salt tolerance, reduce transplant shock, and enhance other valuable organisms in the soil – making them important allies in our efforts to improve fish habitat on many of our riparian projects.


Safety First

Over the last month, some of the Lomakatsi’s staff re-certified their red cards and refreshed their CPR and first aid certifications. A red card is sort of like a license to work on federal lands while responding to a fire or implementing a prescribed burn. CPR and first aid are necessary for the safety of all of Lomakatsi’s crew members who implement our various restoration projects.

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How Fire Diversity Promotes Biodiversity

Here is a link to an article examining pyrodiversity—the varying extent, severity, and frequency of fires within a region—in Yosemite National Park’s Illilouette Basin. A team of National Research Council researchers has found that a diversity of fires can promote the existence of more varied flowering plants and pollinators in an ecosystem as well as provide the ecosystem with a buffer from the negative effects of drought. The studies key results—that a more diverse fire history supported more species of flowering plants and pollinators—add further backing to Lomakatsi’s efforts to restore natural fire as a forest management technique.

Picture2


Tribal Crew works to Restore Redband Trout Habitat

Tribal workers employed by Lomakatsi just completed the final phase of spring planting in an effort to restore the ecological function of the Wild Trout Area riparian corridor along Hat Creek in Shasta County, northern California. Working in close partnership with the Pit River Tribe andCalifornia Trout, our collaborative efforts work to protect wild trout populations and protect the unique cultural and recreational attributes that define Hat Creek as one of California’s most important cold-water spring-fed natural resources. Below are some photos from planting in the area where large wood was recently placed by helicopter, to mitigate erosion and create fish habitat.


Rare Plant Surveys

As part of The Klamath-Rogue Oak Habitat Restoration Project, Lomakatsi partnered with The Nature Conservancy this week to conduct rare plant surveys near Table Rocks, for Fritallaria Gentneri. It was listed as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1999. The City of Jacksonville, OR has set aside over 300 acres of habitat for Gentner’s fritillary and hosts a festival dedicated to the flower every April. Since there are no more than 1,200 populations in total existence, Lomakatsi and our partners are putting forth every effort to preserve this beautiful wildflower in its endemic oak woodland habitat.

FRGE

Wildflower conservation

 

Watershed Closure Update and Recreation Status

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE DURING THIS PROCESS!

The Operations at Lambs Saddle Trailhead area are now completed. Lomakatsi is bringing in special equipment throughout next week to return the roads, trails, and forest restoration staging areas to their pre-existing condition. The Lamb Saddle Trailhead opened Saturday, April 2nd.

Forest restoration activity on the scale being undertaken in the Ashland watershed requires the use of many large machines, including the helicopters and log loaders. While the helicopter minimizes the impact to sensitive slopes, the roads and restoration staging areas have been subjected to heavy use. The impact may look severe, but it is temporary, and will be reclaimed, monitored and ultimately restored. These short-term impacts are expected in large-scale projects, but please know the partnership is working to minimize and restore them.

We will continue to post picture updates today so trail users and cyclists know what to expectFor interviews with he Ashland Forest Resiliency Project Partners

For the Ashland Daily Tidings article on the restoration of Lamb Saddle click here.


 

Alternative Spring Break: Riparian Restoration Along Anderson Creek

Students from OSU traded their traditional Spring Break for one of community service in southern Oregon – what they call their annual “Alternative Spring Break”. Working at Lomakatsi’s Anderson Creek Riparian Restoration Project, they spent a day planting a variety of native trees and shrubs in an effort to bring back native fish habitat, while they learned about water quality and the importance of riparian zones. Species planted include white alder, Oregon Ash, big leaf maple and red osier dogwood. Below are some photos of this service learning day along the creek.

OSU student planing along Anderson creeek

OSU student planting along Anderson creek


 

Spring Member Event Success

On Saturday, March 26th, Lomakatsi members celebrated spring by potting up 200 native shrub seedlings to be grown out and planted next year at local creek restoration projects. A hardy group of members volunteered their time, braving the rain and the cold to help create future forests. The day included testing our knowledge of native plants, and learning more about the projects members are supporting through their contributions. And of course, we had to have delicious treats – this time, carrot cake from My Sweet Ol’ Etcetera.

Thanks everyone for a wonderful welcome to spring!

If this looks like fun and you’d like to get in on the fun, you are in luck! Lomakatsi is currently looking for a group of volunteers to meet once a month to help care for our native plant nursery. This would mean potting plants, watering, fertilizing and keeping plants weed free and organized. If you are interested in volunteering, please fill out the form on our website (http://lomakatsi.org/get-involved/volunteer/). We are thinking the first Saturday of every month but are open to what the group thinks would be the best

Treats for our dedicated volunteers.

Treats for our dedicated volunteers.

Our volunteers potted 200 native shrubs in a few hours and we thank them immensely!

Our volunteers potted 200 native shrubs in a few hours and we thank them immensely!


 

Tribal Workforce Implements Riparian Restoration along Hat Creek

As part of a partnership between Lomakatsi, Pit River Tribe, and California Trout, tribal workers employed by Lomakatsi began interplanting various native plants along the banks of Hat Creek. Further planting will take place next week in an area where large wood was recently placed by helicopter to mitigate erosion and create fish habitat.

Planting near the creek

Planting near the creek.


 

Ashland Forest Resiliency (AFR) Stewardship Project,
Watershed Closure Update and Recreation Status

TRAILS ARE STILL CLOSED until forestry crews get debris dealt with and trails rehabilitated and opened. The operations at Lambs Saddle Trailhead area are now completed. Lomakatsi is bringing in special equipment throughout next week to return the roads, trails, and forest restoration staging areas to their pre-existing condition. If all goes as planned with the rehabilitation Lamb Saddle Trailhead will be open Saturday, April 2nd.

We had hoped to open Lamb Saddle this weekend, but due to continued wet conditions the past few weeks we were unable to finish on schedule. Our contractual partner, Timberline Helicopters, Inc., has brought in a larger helicopter to increase hauling capacity and will likely accelerate the forest restoration operations.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PATIENCE DURING THIS PROCESS!
Forest restoration activity on the scale being undertaken in the Ashland watershed requires the use of many large machines, including the helicopters and log loaders. While the helicopter minimizes the impact to sensitive slopes, the roads and restoration staging areas have been subjected to heavy use. The impact may look severe, but it is temporary, and will be reclaimed, monitored and ultimately restored. These short-term impacts are expected in large-scale projects, but please know the partnership is working to minimize and restore them.

Rehabilitation of the forest restoration staging area at Lamb Saddle will continue throughout the week.

Rehabilitation of the forest restoration staging area at Lamb Saddle will continue throughout the week.


 

Tribal Workforce Restoring Habitat for Wild Trout Populations along Hat Creek in northeastern California.

Over the past three years, Lomakatsi has been working in partnership with the Pit River Tribe and California Trout to restore and reestablish riparian habitat along Hat Creek in northeastern California. As part of a Tribal Workforce Training and Employment Program, Lomakatsi has employed Pit River Tribal members through various stages of the project. The next phase of operations will begin this coming week.

Located on Illmawi ancestral lands, the project works to restore the ecological function of the Wild Trout Area riparian corridor, protect wild trout populations, and protect the unique cultural and recreational attributes that define Hat Creek as one of California’s most important cold-water spring-fed natural resources.

See the short video below produced by California Trout.

https://vimeo.com/148800486


 

AFAR Continues Private Land Management Efforts

As part of the Ashland Forest All Lands Restoration(AFAR) project, to help fund forest restoration and fuels reduction treatments on federal and private lands in and around the Ashland Creek Watershed, Lomakatsi is working with the Novalis Project and 7generations LLC to perform fuel reduction on 30 of their 2,400 acres that nearest border the Ashland Creek watershed. 4000 acres of landscape-scale fuels reduction and forest restoration has been completed as of 2015. AFAR has created 17 direct full-time jobs annually for our saw crew featured in these photos, and 107 jobs with indirect and induced work.

Density management.

Density management.

*The Novalis Project (www.novalisproject.org/) is a non-profit educational organization planning to use their 2,400 acres to provide a unique living laboratory for diverse research, demonstration, and educational programs.


 

Hat Creek Riparian Restoration and Cultural Protection Project Update

Lomakatsi's Tribal Workforce Manager, Joe Ochoa, discussing riparian planting plans with Illmawi Tribal Cultural Committee member and elder, Cecelia Silvas.

Lomakatsi’s Tribal Workforce Manager, Joe Ochoa, discussing riparian planting plans with Illmawi Tribal Cultural Committee member and elder, Cecelia Silvas.

As part of a partnership established in 2013 between the Pit River Tribe, California Trout and Lomakatsi, we are gearing up for the next phase of riparian restoration for the Hat Creek Riparian Restoration and Cultural Protection Project, taking place in Shasta County- northern California. On Tuesday Lomakatsi staff met with members of the Pit River Tribe and Illmawi Cultural leadership to discuss the next phase.

 

 


Restoration of Salmon Habitat in the Applegate

Shading future salmon habitat, one tree at a time.

Shading future salmon habitat, one tree at a time.

Lomakatsi was contracted to implement the Applegate Partnership & Watershed Council’s (APWC) planting plan for the riparian restoration of Thompson Creek. APWC is working to restore 4.4 stream miles of riparian habitat in partnership with landowners along Thompson Creek. This drainage has had the greatest distribution of fish species of the middle Applegate tributaries. High water temperatures annually challenge the survival of these fish. Our restoration crew planted approximately 2,800 native riparian plants in the hopes of lowering the average temperature of Thompson Creek with the additional shade.

 

 


 

The Forest Service, Grayback Forestry, and Lomakatsi had a burn day!

After a hiatus from burning, the Ashland Forest Resiliency Partnership lit burn piles. The forecast of rain should have the benefit of greatly limiting the amount of smoldering material and residual smoke. While pile burning does not have the benefit of large area burning, as a natural fire would, it does rid the forest of the unnatural accumulations of the surface fuels, burns the lower limbs effectively raising the height of the crowns.

AFR unit 36 piles lit

AFR unit 36 piles lit


Willow Winds Youth Planting Day 

4th-7th-grade students from Ashland School Districts John Muir program helped plant over 40 native trees and shrubs at the Willow Wind Community Learning Center next to Bear Creek this week. Other work included building trail, lopping willow, and nature journaling! These students were a real treat to work with, great attitudes, and super hard workers. We thank them for all their help restoring riparian habitat!


Lomakatsi’s Active Project Spotlight:

The Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)

Technicians inventory species composition

Technicians inventory species composition in a 1/10 acre circular plot

RCPP provides financial assistance to landowners to help restore declining oak habitats. The project is a strategic landscape-level effort to focus partner resources on restoring priority oak habitats. One such area is Table Rocks, and recently Lomakatsi’s forester and field technician’s went out to collect vegetation data from a property on the north side of lower table rock. Technicians collected data categorizing the habitat types, fire behavior model, and took inventory of trees and shrubs within a 1/10 acre circular plot. This data will determine the restoration treatment.

Sams Valley from Lower Table Rock

Sams Valley from Lower Table Rock

 


The Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project Successful in Raising Additional $5.64 million to Treat Private Lands

Legacy Ponderosa Pine in the Ashland Forest Watershed

Legacy Ponderosa Pine in the Ashland Forest Watershed

Over the last few years the AFR Project team has developed additional partnerships with private landowners, and state and federal agencies to expand the project to include adjacent private lands under a Conservation Implementation Strategy. This expanded strategy, an all-lands approach, is important to the ultimate success of the project. By including adjacent private land owners in the strategy we are able to better achieve the objectives of protecting important fish and wildlife habitat and restoring forest reliance in the face of climate change and increased fire threat. Partnering with the State of Oregon and Natural Resources Conservation Service we developed proposals that resulted in bringing more than $4.54 million additional dollars into the project to treat private lands. An additional $1.1 million was also recently earmarked by the Pacific Northwest Region of the U.S. Forest Service or reducing wildfire hazard on federal land within the AFAR footprint.

To see the press release click here


 

Ashland High School Students Learn Technical Forestry Skills  

Students learned how to use a map and compass to navigate across the landscape. Other activities taught students how to identify and age trees, as well as calculate slope and asses wildlife habitat. They even got their hands dirty lopping and piling madrone saplings, an exercise in reducing fire fuels in the project area. They were a great group of enthusiastic young people, our staff had a great time.

Students listen as forestry technician explain forest restoration principles and basic navigation skills

Students listen as forestry technicians explain forest restoration principles and basic navigation skills.


Member Event Update

Our monthly member event held on Saturday, February 6th was a huge success thanks to our partner Timberline Helicopters, Inc.. Our members climbed all over the K-max helicopter, also known as the hulk. Everyone enjoyed delicious baked goodies from Four and Twenty Blackbirds Bakery while watching a video of the helicopter in action on the project, from the pilots perspective. We finished off the event with a presentation on The Ashland Forest Resiliency Stewardship Project from our Executive Director Marko Bey.


Pacific Fisher Press

The mail tribute recently published an article featuring Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest’s own Dave Clayton and his ongoing work with Pacific fisher in the Ashland watershed. Fishers are monitored in the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project to inform on-the-ground forest restoration work and assist in minimizing impacts to important wildlife species.

A Pacific Fisher found in the Ashland Watershed

A Pacific Fisher found in the Ashland Watershed


Super Cool  Member Event: Exclusive First-Hand Look at the K-Max Helicopter

IMG_4444 - Copy (1024x683)

On Saturday, Feburary 6th, from  11:30 AM – 3:30 PM members will take a look at the K-Max helicopter being used to perform forest restoration in the Ashland Watershed.

Click here for more information.

 


Exciting New Partnership For Landscape-Scale Restoration

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The U.S. Forest Service, Pit River Tribe and Lomakatsi Restoration Project have signed one of the largest stewardship agreements in U.S. history between the agency and a Native American Tribe. Encompassing a “one hundred mile square” of ancestral tribal homelands, within the Lassen, Modoc and Shasta-Trinity National Forests, the stewardship agreement will allow the Pit River Tribe and the U.S. Forest Service to work together, with the support of Lomakatsi Restoration Project, to design and implement forest and watershed restoration projects that will create tribal jobs and support local industry.

Read the full article here.


Click on the years below to view archives of Lomakatsi’s Accomplishments:
20112012 – 2013 – 2014 – 2015

 

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