Tribal Ecosystem Restoration Partnership Program

Tribal Ecosystem Restoration Partnership Program

Restoring Ecosystems and Enhancing Tribal Economies

Inter-Tribal Ecosystem Restoration Partnership

The goal of ITERP is to restore aquatic and terrestrial habitats, work collaboratively to plan and conduct landscape scale ecological restoration, and repair impacts to ecocultural systems that indigenous communities depend on for subsistence and survival. Read more…

For more than fifteen years Lomakatsi has worked in partnership with Native American Tribes and tribal communities throughout Oregon and Northern California to build sustainable ecosystem restoration programs. Lomakatsi’s tribal staff works closely with tribal and agency partners to incorporate Traditional Ecological Knowledge into ecosystem restoration projects. Tribal partnership initiatives assist in building tribal capacity for the implementation of ecological restoration across thousands of acres of ancestral lands.

Lomakatsi works with tribal and agency partners in establishing long-term ecosystem restoration agreements where projects are implemented across federal, private and tribal trust lands. Partnerships with industry are also established and restoration by-products are generated from ecological thinning, supporting forest -related enterprises by providing saw logs, biomass, and small diameter materials to local mills. Additionally, hundreds of tribal jobs have been created through adult and youth workforce training programs, providing long-term employment.

Click here to learn more about how Lomakatsi incorporates Traditional Ecological Knowledge into our programs.

Lomakatsi partners with regional tribes for restoration project on Fort Bidwell Reservation. Project brought together members of three tribes, the Fort Bidwell Northern Paiute, Pit River Tribe, and Klamath Tribes of Oregon. Tribal Members worked together to restore 50 acres of sage-steppe grassland habitat.

Lomakatsi partners with regional tribes for restoration project on Fort Bidwell Reservation. Project brought together members of three tribes, the Fort Bidwell Northern Paiute, Pit River Tribe, and Klamath Tribes of Oregon. Tribal Members worked together to restore 50 acres of sage-steppe grassland habitat.

As part of the Fremont-Winema Forest Restoration Stewardship Project, the Klamath Tribal Youth Training and Employment Program utilized the forested landscape as an outdoor laboratory. Collaborative partners of the project include the Klamath Tribes, Lomakatsi Restoration Project, The Nature Conservancy and the US Forest Service.

As part of the Fremont-Winema Forest Restoration Stewardship Project, the Klamath Tribal Youth Training and Employment Program utilized the forested landscape as an outdoor laboratory. Collaborative partners of the project include the Klamath Tribes, Lomakatsi Restoration Project, The Nature Conservancy and the US Forest Service.

Media coverage highlights:

Seeking aid from the original fire experts, April 2, 2019, by Caitlin Fowlkes, Ashland Tidings, Ashland Oregon.

Fighting wildfire with youth, March 30, 2019, by Nick Morgan, Mail Tribune, Medford, Oregon.

Bridging Cultures to Restore Hat Creek Wild Trout Area, June 22, 2018, by ICT Editorial Team, Indian Country Today, Washington, DC.

A natural career: Klamath Tribes members learn forest stewardship from Lomakatsi, July 5, 2018, by Morgan Theopil, Mail Tribune, Medford, Oregon.

Outdoor classroom: Hands-on training, tribal history included in restoration projectJuly 26, 2014, by Nora Avery-Page, Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon. For more about Lomakatsi’s Klamath Tribal Youth Training & Employment Program in the summer of 2014, with Lomakatsi photos, click here.

Organizations collaborate to establish restoration — Project managers report boost of workers’ skills, November 25, 2012, by Devan Schwartz, Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Forest Warriors, — Tribal group conducts restoration projects, gets on-the-job training, Jan 26, 2012, Herald & News, Klamath Falls, OR, featuring the Klamath TribesThe Nature Conservancy, and Lomakatsi.   For more info about the site at Sycan Marsh, click here and here.

Bringing ‘balance’ to nature — Klamath Tribal members hope to use skills on ancestral land“, by Vickie Aldous, Ashland Daily Tidings, May 26, 2011.

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